The 'telepathy' chip, turn on the TV using the power of thought
2009 10 08

By David Derbyshire | NoOneHasToDieTomorrow.com


A ‘telepathy’ chip that allows people to control computers, televisions and light switches by the power of thought is being developed by British scientists.

The tiny sensor would sit on the surface of the brain, picking up the electrical activity of nerve cells and passing the signal wirelessly to a receiver on the skull.

The signal would then be used to control a cursor on a computer screen, operate electronic gadgets or steer an electric wheelchair.


The chip is the brainchild of Dr Jon Spratley, 28, from Stevenage, Hertfordshire, who developed a prototype during his PhD at Birmingham University.

'We are just trying to help people with severe communication problems or motor neurone disease - like Dr Stephen Hawking or Christopher Reeve,' he said.


'What we have designed would allow them to control a computer with their thoughts. If they imagine their muscles moving, that could flick a light switch for example.

'It's an area that is being heavily researched in America but so far all the tests have involved wired sensors. This prototype uses wireless technology to remove the risk of infection and that's the real drive of our work.

'The eventual aim would be to see these systems fully working so they are available to help patients communicate. That's the future.'


The 1.3mm 'multi-contact brain probe' has yet to be tested on a living person or animal. However, tests on brain slices in a laboratory have been promising.

Earlier this year, Japanese researchers unveiled a wheelchair powered by brainwaves. The user wears a cap fitted with electrodes that monitor brain activity.

Scientists have also developed a robotic arm controlled by thought. In tests, monkeys were able to feed themselves using the mechanical limb.

Dr Spratley's invention is a tiny sensor designed to be injected by needle into the brain. The chip has 50 'contact spikes' that connect to nerve cells in the brain.

As the needle is withdrawn, four coil antennae - each just 1mm across - are unfurled on the surface of the brain. These communicate wirelessly with a 'base station' - a 16mm diameter receiver that is permanently placed in the hole left by the needle.

The device picks up neural signals from the brain's motor cortex and transmits the impulses via the base station to a receiver connected to a computer.

Dr Spratley said just seven unique 'thought commands' are needed to provide mouse-like controls for a computer.

He believes implanting the chips will require minimal invasive surgery - yet could change the life of a quadriplegic or motor neurone disease sufferer.

'It began as an investigation into what signals paralysed people can generate,' he said.

'If they can imagine using a limb, even if they can't move it, you can tap into that signal.

'Then you just have to imagine moving the muscle and the leg will move, the brain will train itself.

'Stephen Hawking could just think about using his muscles to operate his machine, rather than have to move his cheek.

'And yes, it would have worked for Christopher Reeve. Muscle control comes back.

'My work was only ever going to be the tip of the iceberg and I hope eventually it will help people. I am glad they are taking it forward.'

Previous chips have relied on cables and wires to send brain signals from a sensor to a controller outside the body.

Dr Spratley, who now works for Cambridgeshire-based company 42Technology, says the wireless chip is safer.

He is now looking for funding to start human trials.

Article from:


Red Ice Creations Radio - William Henry - Stargate Technology & Transhumanism (Subscription)

Red Ice Creations Radio - Aaron Franz - The Age of Transitions

Red Ice Creations Radio - Aaron Franz - The Age of Transitions Continued (Subscription)

Red Ice Creations Radio - Michael Tsarion - The Post Human World



Related Articles
Google 'evangelist' sees web, brain implant link
ESP, remote viewing actually ‘complementary cognition?’
Genetic Engineering and the Brave New World of Transhuman Machines
Oh, The Transhumanity!
The future of mobiles: powered by a heartbeat
Hackers attack heart of the net
Docs wire up world's first internet-connected pacemaker
Our Cyborg Future?
'We'll be able to upload our brains to a computer'
High-tech hearing aid is the ultimate iPod accessory
42Technology
Multi-contact brain probe can be injected through a needle


Latest News from our Front Page

NATO Exercise in Ukraine Coincided with MH-17 Shoot-down
2014 07 24
Rapid Trident was omitted from the flurry of coverage on the shoot-down MH-17. From the U.S. Army in Europe website: Rapid Trident supports interoperability among Ukraine, the United States, NATO and Partnership for Peace member nations. The exercise helps prepare participants to operate successfully in a joint, multinational, integrated environment with host-nation support from civil and governmental agencies. ...
Warning of ’imminent’ terror attack in Norway
2014 07 24
Norwegians were warned Thursday of the concrete possibility of a terror attack occurring in that country at the hands of people with connections to an extremist group in Syria. A press conference was called in Oslo, Norway on Thursday where an announcement was made of a "possible concrete threat" to national security in that country from terrorists related to an extremist ...
Judge says government can access everything in a Gmail account
2014 07 24
All your emails are belong to us. At least that’s what the latest court order from a judge in New York says. The warrant, granted on June 11, states that the government can access all the content and files contained in a Gmail account. Yes, this is a significant blow to privacy. The subject of this specific search relates to a money laundering ...
Scotland Yard Spied on Grieving Families: secret surveillance after police victim shot seven times in head ’by mistake’
2014 07 24
More terror from the ’anti-terror’ brigade. Undercover police gathered evidence on 18 grieving families By Rob Evans and Vikram Dodd | The Guardian Undercover police officers secretly gathered intelligence over two decades on 18 families fighting to get justice from the police, it was revealed on Thursday. The intelligence covering high-profile campaigns was collected between the mid-1980s and 2005, and affected grieving families ...
Air Algerie AH5017 with 116 onboard goes missing for hours, found crashed in Mali
2014 07 24
An Air Algerie flight carrying 110 passengers and six crew members has reportedly crashed in Mali after having disappeared from radar early on Thursday morning between Burkina Faso and Algeria. A French Ministry of Defense official told Fox News that the two French fighter jets located the wreckage of the plane, which had crashed in Mali. An airport official additionally confirmed ...
More News »