GM Wheat May Permanently Alter Human Genome, Spark Early Death
2012-10-30 0:00

By Lisa Garber | NaturalSociety.com

Experts say that the GM wheat currently in development by an Australian governmental research agency could, if ingested, shut down certain genes, leading to premature death or risk thereof to multiple generations.


The GM wheat developed by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) using public funds is engineered to turn off genes permanently. The organization’s intent to turn off wheat genes, however, could affect human and animal genes.




“Through ingestion, these molecules can enter human beings and potentially silence our genes,” says Professor Jack Heinemann of the University of Canterbury’s Centre for Integrated Research in Biosafety. His report was published in Digital Journal.


DNA Matches in GM Wheat and Humans


The wheat genes intended to be silenced are known as SEI, the sequence of which are classified by CSIRO. What experts know about SEI is that parts of it match the human GBE gene sequence. GBE dictates glycogen storage, without which the liver scars and causes death in children. Adults with malfunctioning GBE genes can experience cognitive impairment, pyramidal quadriplegia, peripheral neuropathy, and neurogenic bladder.


“The findings are absolutely assured,” insists Heinemann.  “There is no doubt that these matches exist.”


Survives Digestion, Cooking, Generations


Moreover, Heinemann describes the double stranded RNA (dsRNAs) present in GM wheat as “remarkably stable in the environment.” It is able to withstand digestion (even after cooking) and thereafter circulates through the body, where it amplifies into more and different dsRNAs and “alters gene expression in the animal.” These altered genes are passed to later generations, assuming the consumer doesn’t die of cancer or liver damage before procreating – seen in the recent GMO french study.



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Read the full article at: naturalsociety.com








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