Court says widow can use dead husbandís sperm
2011 05 25

From: France24.com


An Australian woman on Monday won a court battle to use her dead husbandís sperm to have a baby in a landmark case in New South Wales, where IVF treatment is banned without consent of the donor.

Jocelyn Edwards, 40, and husband Mark had discussed fertility treatment after she failed to fall pregnant and they were due to sign in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) consent forms on August 6 last year.

However, the husband died in a workplace accident the day before.

His sperm was collected after his death and his widow has been fighting since then to win control over it.


File photo shows a lab technician at a fertility clinic.

New South Wales Supreme Court Justice Robert Hulme said there was only two conclusions he could reach -- either destroy the sperm or give it to Edwards, and he found in her favour as the administrator of her late husbandís estate.

However, she cannot have the sperm inseminated in New South Wales, where IVF is banned without the donorís consent. Instead, she must go elsewhere.

"Itís the right decision. Mark would be so happy, weíre going to have our baby. Thatís what I plan to do," Edwards told reporters outside the court.

"I just want to get past today, enjoy the moment. Itís been a long, long, long, difficult time," she added.


Article from: france24.com




Related Articles
My father, sperm donor 150
Scientists grow sperm in a lab
Taking the whole world with it: Israelís declining sperm quality tied to its depleted uranium
Man Produces 1,500 Sperm a Second
Evidence Found for Ancient Supersized Sperm
Judge: OK to Collect Dead Sonís Sperm


Latest News from our Front Page

Artists íhave structurally different brainsí
2014 04 17
Artists have structurally different brains compared with non-artists, a study has found. Participantsí brain scans revealed that artists had increased neural matter in areas relating to fine motor movements and visual imagery. The research, published in NeuroImage, suggests that an artistís talent could be innate. But training and environmental upbringing also play crucial roles in their ability, the authors report. As in many areas ...
NSA-proof email service goes online
2014 04 17
A new email service that protects its users from the prying eyes of the NSA and other spy agencies has gone online. The serviceís creators say it will make encrypted messaging accessible to all and curtail internet snooping. Germany-based Lavaboom was inspired by Lavabit, the encrypted email service that was believed to have been used by whistleblower Edward Snowden before it ...
Investigative Journalist Michael C. Ruppert Dead After Lifelong Struggle With Mental Illness
2014 04 17
Weíre sad to hear the news about the death of Michael Ruppert. Rest in Peace. From Collapse Network, which is being constantly updated with new information: There is absolutely no doubt or question about it, Mike Ruppert took his own life. Rest in Peace, my brother. Wes Wesley T. Miller President & CEO Collapse Network, Inc. ******* I have been informed that MCR has committed suicide. I ...
Cyclopean Masonry: A Mystery of the Ancient World
2014 04 16
They donít make things like they used to, and that is, in some cases, a monumental understatement. Silly wordplay notwithstanding, there is something to be said for the construction techniques of the old world. Where modern buildings are designed to withstand the elements; wind, temperature extremes, earthquakes and floods, todayís engineers have to strike a balance between economics ...
Megalithic Origins : Ancient connections between GŲbekli Tepe and Peru
2014 04 16
At 6,500 years older than Stonehenge and 7,000 years before the pyramids were constructed, a cult megalithic complex sat atop the hills near current day Sanliurfa, in southeast Turkey. GŲbekli Tepe was flourishing an astonishing 12,000 - 14,000 years ago, and today, the preserved remains still exhibits high degrees of sophistication and megalithic engineering skill. Back in the 1990ís when ...
More News Ľ