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Manifestations
2006 05 14

By Jeff Wells | rigorousintuition.blogspot.com

Last year, California and Florida. Yesterday:

Doctors puzzled over bizarre infection surfacing in South Texas

If diseases like AIDS and bird flu scare you, wait until you hear what's next. Doctors are trying to find out what is causing a bizarre and mysterious infection that's surfaced in South Texas.

Morgellons disease is not yet known to kill, but if you were to get it, you might wish you were dead, as the symptoms are horrible.

"These people will have like beads of sweat but it's black, black and tarry," said Ginger Savely, a nurse practioner in Austin who treats a majority of these patients.

Patients get lesions that never heal. "Sometimes little black specks that come out of the lesions and sometimes little fibers," said Stephanie Bailey, Morgellons patient.

Patients say that's the worst symptom strange fibers that pop out of your skin in different colors. "He'd have attacks and fibers would come out of his hands and fingers, white, black and sometimes red. Very, very painful," said Lisa Wilson, whose son Travis had Morgellon's disease.

While all of this is going on, it feels like bugs are crawling under your skin. So far more than 100 cases of Morgellons disease have been reported in South Texas. "It really has the makings of a horror movie in every way," Savely said.
As before, most medical professionals refuse to recognize the disease, calling it instead "Delusional Parasitosis." And what do I know? Perhaps they're right. Perhaps Travis Wilson was delusional, and his mother as well, when she tried and failed to remove a spaghetti-like fibre from a lesion in his chest. ("I knew he was going to kill himself, and there was nothing I could do to stop him," Lisa Wilson said.)

One sufferer, "Ever Hopeful", writes "I came down with Delusions of Parasitosis in 2001.... Oddly enough, my delusions, although mostly microscopic, are completely capable of being photographed."

Below is an image of one of the "starfish" she plucked from a lesion. "They don't really look like starfish," she says, "but I didn't want to call them spiders (staying away from the insect and arachnid vocabulary - somebody might think I really believed they were spiders)."

Austin Nurse Ginger Savely says, "Believe me, if I just randomly saw one of these patients in my office, I would think they were crazy too. But after you've heard the story of over 100 (patients) and they're all down to the most minute detail saying the exact same thing, that becomes quite impressive." Sound familiar? To me, it sounds like Dr Corydon Hammond's "Hypnosis in Multiple Personality Disorder: Ritual Abuse" - the Greenbaum Speech:
When you start to find the same highly esoteric information in different states and different countries, from Florida to California, you start to get an idea that there's something going on that is very large, very well coordinated, with a great deal of communication and sytematicness to what's happening.
According to the Morgellons Foundation, it has received reports of cases in every state, though the majority are clustered in California, Texas and Florida. There's much speculation, based in part upon the research of Will Thomas, that the disease is precipitated - and almost literally, precipitation - by the fall of aerosol polymer fibres allegedly found in chemtrail samples.

Regardless, both chemtrails and morgellons share something else: they both manifest things that shouldn't be, before our eyes and in our flesh, and are perhaps representative of either thought-forms of a fear that's only in our heads, or the expression of a eugenic will-to-death that is in the heads of others. Which is it? That artless debunker of 9/11 strawmen Benjamin Chertoff says there's nothing to worry about. Who's worried now?

Article from: http://rigorousintuition.blogspot.com/2006/05/manifestations_13.html


Related: Is Morgellons Disease Caused By Chemtrail Spraying?

Chemtrails - Predictions

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