World "Leaders" totally Ignore Climategate, Says: "Momentum Building on Climate Change"
2009-11-28 0:00

From: google.com


UN Secretary-General Ban Ki moon, left, and Danish Prime Minister Lars Loekke Rasmussen, right, look on during a press conference on climate change at the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting (CHOGM) in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, Saturday Nov. 28, 2009.


Leaders of the Commonwealth countries called Saturday for a legally binding international agreement on climate change and a global fund with billions of dollars to help poorer countries meet its mandates.

The 53-nation meeting was the largest gathering of world leaders before next month's global climate summit in Copenhagen.

The leaders said a deal should be adopted no later than next year and the support money should be available simultaneously, providing up to $10 billion a year starting in 2012.

Ban Ki-moon calls on world leaders to seal a deal in Copenhagen


At least 10 percent of the fund, the group said, should be dedicated to small island and low-lying coastal nations, which are at risk of catastrophic changes from global warming.

"Climate change is the predominant global challenge," the Commonwealth leaders, meeting in the twin-island Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago, said in a declaration. "For some of us, it is an existential threat."

The document called for a "legally binding" agreement.

Danish Prime Minister Lars Loekke Rasmussen and U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, making rare appearances at a Commonwealth meeting to help drive the climate discussion, portrayed the joint declaration as further evidence of building momentum for next month's summit.

"I will leave Trinidad fully convinced that it will be possible to reach an ambitious agreement in Copenhagen," Loekke Rasmussen told reporters after the Commonwealth leaders issued their statement following a private meeting.

Some 90 countries have now agreed to attend the summit in Denmark, he said.

The Commonwealth's endorsement of a global fund comes a day after British Prime Minister Gordon Brown and French President Nicolas Sarkozy, both attending the meeting in Trinidad, also backed the idea, a sign of growing consensus on what has been a major issue to be resolved before any global climate deal.

Brown said Britain would contribute $1.3 billion over three years, but other countries have not yet specified their commitments.

The biennial meeting of the Commonwealth, made up mostly of former British colonies, attracted an unusual level of attention this year because of climate change. It brought together some of the key countries in the global debate, including India, Canada and Australia, amid debate over cutting carbon emissions and the economic effects of those cuts.

Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh said Friday that his country is willing to sign an ambitious global target. But he set no specific figures and insisted it be accompanied by "equitable burden sharing."

Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd told reporters that "progress is being made. You see as each day passes a large number of states come forward with their own national commitments."

Source: google.com



Related Articles
Climategate: the final nail in the coffin of 'Anthropogenic Global Warming'?
Climategate: The BBC is still pretending not to notice
Climategate: the Conservative backlash begins
UEA Climate Scientist: “possible that…I.P.C.C. has run its course”
Commonwealth leaders back climate change fund


Latest News from our Front Page

Galaxy Poll: 86 per cent of Australians want childhood vaccination to be compulsory?
2015-04-17 23:33
Australians want Prime Minister Tony Abbott to make childhood vaccination compulsory and close loopholes that allow vaccine refusers to put all children at risk. An exclusive national Galaxy poll commissioned by The Sunday Telegraph has revealed overwhelming support to ensure every child is vaccinated. The highest support for compulsory jabs is in South Australia, where 90 per cent support the call. The poll ...
Eye in the sky: Local police now using drones to spy on citizens
2015-04-17 22:09
The Harris County Precinct 1 Constable's Office is doing something that no other agency in Harris County is believed to have done yet: Use drones to help fight crime. It's an eye in the sky for law enforcement, without giving up the element of surprise. "It could absolutely save lives," says Constable Alan Rosen. Rosen says the agency's two new $1,200 drones, which ...
New Zealander of the Year: refuse vaccines, lose money
2015-04-17 22:47
Following in the footsteps of Australia, 2014 New Zealander of the Year, Dr. Lance O’Sullivan, wants to punish people who don’t get vaccinated. The New Zealand Herald (4/15) reports: “A leading New Zealand doctor has called on the Government to follow Australia’s example to cut child welfare payments to families who do not vaccinate their children, saying the policy would help protect ...
Iris Scanner Identifies a Person 40 Feet Away
2015-04-17 22:20
Police traffic stops are in the news again, tragically, sparking a new round of discussion on whether and how to outfit police with cameras and other technology. For several years now, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s CyLab Biometrics Center have been testing an iris recognition system that can be used to identify subjects at a range of up to 40 feet. Like ...
Yes, You Can Catch Insanity
2015-04-17 22:29
One day in March 2010, Isak McCune started clearing his throat with a forceful, violent sound. The New Hampshire toddler was 3, with a Beatles mop of blonde hair and a cuddly, loving personality. His parents had no idea where the guttural tic came from. They figured it was springtime allergies. Soon after, Isak began to scream as if in pain ...
More News »