Mikael Odenberg's PreCrime - "Preventive bugging" in Sweden
2007-01-12 0:00

By Henrik Palmgren | redicecreations.com

Hahaha, Please read the article below. It's based on a survey of 1,000 Swedes, oh wow that’s a bunch! This is a perfect example of how to sway public opinion with polls and survey's.


Above: Sweden’s Minister of Defence Mikael Odenberg (Moderate party), he’s the guy behind the most recent proposition to bug Swedes telephone calls, emails and SMS.

Let's not forget that Odenberg's predecessor Leni Björklund (Social democrat) already two years ago tried to give FRA (försvarets topphemliga spionavlyssningscentral or National Defense Radio Establishment) the right to spy on Swedish citizens, without suspicion of crime being committed. And former Minister of Justice Thomas Bodström (Social democrat) also wanted to give SÄPO ( Swedish Security Service) the legal right to do so called “preventive bugging”.

All of these guys and gals work for the same team! They regurgitate the same stupid propositions on a regular basis to keep the discussion on this level. Illegal bugging and spying by SÄPO among others have been going on since the 70’s in Sweden, so the energy and focus should be on the organizations working above the law. But that doesn't make it any less scary that they actually are trying to implement so called “preventive bugging.” (We're getting closer to Philip K. Dick's PreCrime).

Swedes favour more bugging
Article from: thelocal.se

A large majority of Swedes like the idea of additional surveillance to aid in the hunt for terrorists and serious criminals.

A survey carried out by Statistics Sweden shows that a full 80 percent of Swedes favour increased surveillance.

But while the general public supports plans to keep a closer eye on the population, public bodies have been lining up to criticise defence minister Mikael Odenberg's proposal to permit the monitoring of ordinary citizens' phone calls and email.

Writing on behalf of the Register Board, former intelligence chief Anders Eriksson warned of the possible effects of the minister's proposal.

"If the bill is implemented Sweden will become a warning example of what can happen to the rule of law and the protection of personal integrity," wrote Eriksson.

The Swedish Security Service described the proposal as "alien to the form of government to which we are accustomed".

The defence minister's Moderate Party colleague Henrik von Sydow also called on Odenberg to rethink.

"We know from experience that all surveillance entails a risk of abuse and leaks," he wrote in Thursday's Dagens Nyheter.

But the survey of 1,000 Swedes carried out on behalf of the Committee for the Protection of Integrity, showed overwhelming support for extended surveillance, according to Sveriges Radio.

Almost 80 percent of those surveyed thought that citizens should be checked more thoroughly in order to tackle terrorism and serious crime.

An even higher number, 87 percent, were of the opinion that police should be able to secretly bug telephones and access computers.

Just over half of the people surveyed, 51 percent, were in favour of a DNA register of all citizens.

The idea of having more camera surveillance in public places was supported by 97 percent of respondents.

TT/The Local

Article from: http://www.thelocal.se/6073/20070112/



Related Articles


Latest News from our Front Page

The Unsafe Child: Less Outdoor Play is Causing More Harm than Good
2015-09-02 0:39
The third grade classroom that was visiting our nature center for the day consisted of mostly boys–rowdy, loud and rambunctious boys. As we started out into the woods, the children spoke loudly to each other in anticipation of what was to come. After playing a quick game and explaining the ground rules, it was time for free play. As soon ...
Rights group demand police need warrant to access data
2015-09-01 23:48
American citizens should be able to rest safe in the knowledge that no one has the right to pry into their digital records, where they have been and how long they stayed there. The Supreme Court has just received a brief from the Electronic Frontier Federation (EFF) stating that this should certainly be the case. However, in the case of Davis v. ...
Murder Rates Rising Sharply in Many U.S. Cities
2015-09-01 23:33
Cities across the nation are seeing a startling rise in murders after years of declines, and few places have witnessed a shift as precipitous as this city [Milwaukee]. With the summer not yet over, 104 people have been killed this year–after 86 homicides in all of 2014. More than 30 other cities have also reported increases in violence from a year ...
Bulgaria - Islamic State Terrorists Caught Crossing Into Europe Posing As Refugees
2015-09-01 23:47
Bulgarian authorities near the Gyueshevo border checkpoint detained the five men, aged between 20 and 24, late on Wednesday, Bulgarian broadcaster NOVA TV reported. The men were stopped by a border guard, who they attempted to bribe with a “wad of dollars.” However, they were searched and Islamic State propaganda, specific Jihadists prayers and decapitation videos were found on their phones. In ...
How This NY Mom Made the Case for Her Son’s Religious Vaccine Exemption
2015-09-01 22:27
An unidentified, Russian immigrant mother who practices the Russian Orthodox faith, has secured a religious vaccine exemption for her autistic son. New York has a bill on the table to eliminate religious exemption and to root out those who weren’t refusing vaccines on strictly devout, religious grounds. Yet, this woman’s plight goes back before talk of eliminating the exemption – two ...
More News »