Real-Time Facial Recognition Offered to Police in New Program
2013-11-11 0:00

By Nicholas West | ActivistPost

The San Diego Police Department is reporting their involvement in the largest facial recognition program to date. It is something straight out of theaters of war, but is set to hit the streets of America in the very near future if all goes according to plan.


Facial recognition technology, and the databases that catalog and store the results, is advancing at a pace that is difficult to contain. In 2006, the performance of face recognition algorithms were evaluated in the Face Recognition Grand Challenge (FRGC). High-resolution face images, 3-D face scans, and iris images were used in the tests. The results indicated that the new algorithms are 10 times more accurate than the face recognition algorithms of 2002 and 100 times more accurate than those of 1995. Some of the algorithms were able to outperform human participants in recognizing faces and could uniquely identify identical twins. (Source) And that was 2006.

One of the latest military-grade systems can now scan 36 million faces per second, or every face in the U.S. within 10 seconds. It is a technology that has trickled down from use in war zones like Afghanistan to catalog potential terrorists, to U.S. border control applications for combating illegal immigration, to FBI crime detection, to post-riot analysis, and right on down to establishing personal ID for a wide range of private companies.

One of the more troubling aspects of what the San Diego PD is looking to implement is that it will be used on the presumably innocent until proven guilty.

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Read the full article at: activistpost.com



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