Medical insanity: Prozac prescriptions rise sharply in family pets
2013-10-04 0:00

By Jonathan Benson | NaturalNews

The culture of prescription drug addiction in America seems to be spreading to the pet population, as an increasing number of pet owners opt to medicate their furry family members into behavioral compliance with mind-altering mood medications like Prozac. A recent report by MyFoxNY.com explains that more pet owners are choosing to dope up their pets with calming meds in order to address behavioral issues rather than simply spend more time exercising and playing with them, which is what they really need.

New York City-based pet expert and trainer Andrea Arden is deeply concerned about this disturbing trend, which she says has seen a massive uptick within the past 10 years. The overall number of pet prescriptions being filled for dangerous mind-altering drugs like Prozac and Xanax, for instance, is simply staggering, and the root cause of the issue likely has nothing to do with pets themselves and everything to do with overly busy and even irresponsible pet owners.

"Animals are expected to live more constrained lives," explained Arden to MyFoxNY.com. "I think people are busier and busier, especially with the economic downfall. They’re working more so they have less time for their pets, and I think as a result we’re seeing more behavioral problems with animals."

Back in 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) actually granted approval for a Prozac medication specifically designed for dogs. Drug giant Eli Lilly, in conjunction with Elanco, created a once-daily chewable Prozac drug known as Reconcile, which quells the nervousness and anxiety often experienced by dogs when their owners leave the house or are gone for long periods of time.

"I think it’s mostly owners looking for a quick fix," added Arden. "I think what people need to think about is [how] to find a way to spend more time with their animals, more quality time with their animals, and they really need to focus on enriching their lives so that they have fewer behavioral problems."

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Read the full article at: naturalnews.com




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