Getting Personal – Your Pulse Could Be Your New Password
2013 09 18

Red Ice Creations

Solving Problems That Aren’t Problems

One doesn’t have to be a luddite to question the recent advancements in the tech device and biometrics industry. Apple just released its new iPhone with onboard biometric fingerprint scanning. This new product by Bionym, Nymi, seeks to use your identifying heartbeat to sign you in to places where you’d require a password.



While medical advancements to help people lead happier, healthier lives is a benefit of advanced technology, the applications proposed for these recent biometric-directed apps and devices insist that ’logging in’ with a traditional password is arduous, and waving your wrist at a Starbucks cash register is living life to the fullest. In the meantime, we do less and less with our own lives because it’s ’conveniently’ all done for us. Why even leave the house?

Questions should be raised in how our privacy may be diminished as government agencies and corporate industries are constantly updated on our location, our habits, our interactions and our physical biological status.

Mashable.com’s Lance Ulanoff says:

“It’s going to be a way for us to interact with the world around us without having to constantly identify ourselves,”

No, Lance - this will be a way to constantly identify ourselves. You’re just not tapping in a code.


First world problems don’t always require ’solving’.


As reported on CBS New York...

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Getting Personal – Your Pulse Could Be Your New Password
From: CBSNewYork

Pin Numbers, Credit Cards, And Passwords Could Soon Be A Thing Of The Past

Passwords, pin numbers, and credit cards could soon be a thing of the past.

Soon, your heart and your body might be used to keep track of just about everything if new technology is able to unlock “pulse passwords”.

Your heartbeat reveals more about you than your health, Bionym chief executive officer Karl Martin explained.

“There’s actually unique characteristics that relate to the size of the heart, the position of the heart, and the physiology surrounding the heart,” he said.

Our heartbeats are as unique to us as our fingerprints and now they are being used to replace passwords, key cards, and bank cards, CBS 2′s Kristine Johnson reported.

“It’s like your personal pin number is your heartbeat,” Mashable.com’s Lance Ulanoff said.

The technology could allow you to open a door without a key or have tech gadgets like smartphones and tablets unlock the second that you walk into a room. It sounds like something out of a science fiction movie, but experts say it is the wave of the future.

“It’s going to be a way for us to interact with the world around us without having to constantly identify ourselves,” Ulanoff explained.

Bionym, a Canadian company, developed a wristband to recognize the pattern of an individual pulse. The wristband transmits information that allows the user to do things like withdrawing money without a bank card.

“You don’t have to remember anything. You don’t have to do anything special,” Ulanoff said.

Bionym isn’t the only company developing concepts that use the human body as a form of identification. Motorola is working on a temporary tattoo that contains a computer chip and an antenna.

A pill that dissolves and turns the entire body into a transmitter is also in the works.

[...]

Read the full article at: cbslocal.com





Look how ’convenient’ this can all be!:




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