Software uses brain scans to identify exactly what people are looking at
2013 08 23

By Jack Blood | Deadline Live

Researchers are a step closer to being able to read people’s thoughts after creating a computer program that can identify what someone is looking at using brain scans.

A team from Radboud University Nijmegen in the Netherlands used image and shape recognition software and a specially designed algorithm to assess changes in a person’s brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology.

During tests the scientists showed participants a series of letters and were able to identify exactly when, during the scan, they were looking at which letters.


Dutch researchers have created software that when used with brain scans can identify the shape and outline of what a person is looking at. During tests, scientists showed participants letters, pictured, and ran the changes that occurred in the brain after each letter was shown through a bespoke algorithm to identify them.

Dutch researchers used fMRI scans to zoom in on changes, pictured, in specific regions of the brain called voxels, in the occipital lobe. These voxels are around 2x2x2 millimetres big and the occipital lobe is the part of the brain which reacts to visual stimuli and processes what the eyes can see through the retina.

[...]

Read the full article at: datelinelive.info



Tune into Red Ice Radio:

Susanne Posel - Hour 1 - Mortgage Fraud & False Memory Implant

Anthony Gucciardi - Hour 1 - Boston Bombings, Gun Control & Transhumanism

James Corbett - Transhumanism, Neofeudalism & the Green Movement

Aaron Franz - The Philosophical Roots of Transhumanism

Kevin Warwick - I, Cyborg, Implants, Cybernetics, AI & The Rise of the Machines in 2020

Nick Begich - Hour 1 - Controlling the Human Mind





Related Articles
The mind-reading computer that could communicate with coma patients
New tool peeks into brain to measure consciousness
There are differences in brain waves between people who recall dreams and those who don’t
Brain Implants to Enhance Our Senses?
DARPA Issues Request For Information to Create a Computer Brain
MIT Neuroscientists Can Implant Fake Memories into the Brain


Latest News from our Front Page

The Aeon of Horus is Ending and the Elites are Nervous as their Icons are Dying
2014 04 18
I predict there is going to be a huge resurgence of interest in European indigenous spiritual traditions from Norse to Celtic/Gaelic to Slavic and so on. Millions of Europeans are going to realise that we are the victims of Christianity and New Age garbage. Their bastardised Kabbalah, the psychic force used by Crowley and the elites to cement his Aeon ...
Easter - Christian or Pagan?
2014 04 18
From: truthbeknown.com Contrary to popular belief, Easter does not represent the "historical" crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ. In reality, the gospel tale reflects the annual "crossification" of the sun through the vernal equinox (Spring), at which time the sun is "resurrected," as the day begins to become longer than the night. Rather than being a "Christian" holiday, Easter celebrations date back ...
Man-Made Blood Might Be Used in Transfusions by 2016
2014 04 18
Researchers in the U.K. have created the first man-made red blood cells of high enough quality to be introduced into the human body The premise of the HBO show and book series True Blood revolves around a technological breakthrough: scientists figure out how to synthesize artificial human blood, which, as an ample new source of non-human food, allows vampires to "come ...
The Trials of the Cherokee Were Reflected In Their Skulls
2014 04 18
Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Tennessee have found that environmental stressors – from the Trail of Tears to the Civil War – led to significant changes in the shape of skulls in the eastern and western bands of the Cherokee people. The findings highlight the role of environmental factors in shaping our physical characteristics. ...
Our Fears May Be Shaped by Ancestral Trauma
2014 04 18
Last December, an unsettling Nature Neuroscience study found that mice who were taught to associate the smell of cherry blossoms with pain produced offspring who feared the smell of cherry blossoms, even if they had never been exposed to it before. We knew that the process was epigenetic—that it was not hard-wired in the permanent genetic structure of the mouse—but ...
More News »