Telescopic contact lens lets you zoom in on the world
2013-07-02 0:00

By Paul Marks | NewScientist



Who wouldn’t want to have vision like the Terminator? The possibility is coming into sight thanks to the development of a contact lens that would allow wearers to zoom in on points of interest.

Just over a millimetre thick, the telescopic lens works by having a central unmagnified optical path that is surrounded by a ring of optics that magnify the view 2.8 times. Liquid crystal shutters then block one or the other of these optical paths – allowing the user to switch between regular and magnified vision.

Developed by Eric Tremblay and colleagues at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne, Switzerland, and at the University of California, San Diego, the lens has been tested on a life-sized model of the human eye. The work has been funded by DARPA, the US defence research agency.

The team built the LCD shutter mechanism into a modified pair of Samsung 3D TV glasses, placed over the eyeball, to simulate that effect. But the groups is confident that the LCD technology can be built into the lens easily – but how it will be switched on and off has yet to be revealed.

Results so far are promising, the team says. "Although the magnified images were clearly visible in our tests, acuity fell short of the design specification," the researchers report. But they believe they know how to fix the diffraction-related issues with improved refractive optics.

Getting soft

In addition to improving the image, the team also needs to move from the current experimental hard lens – made from hard, clear plastic – to a rigid but gas-permeable material that lets fresh air get to the eyeball, just as in modern soft contact lenses.

[...]

Read the full article at: newscientist.com



Related Articles
So It Begins: Darpa Sets Out to Make Computers That Can Teach Themselves
DARPA’s 1.8 Gigapixel ARGUS-IS: World’s Highest Resolution Surveillance System
DARPA Wants a Searchable Database of All Your Conversations
Watch Darpa’s "Rescue Robot" Jump, Climb and Dodge Obstacles
Meet ‘Robbie’: Darpa’s Seeing, Feeling, Two-Armed Robot
This Man Is Not a Cyborg. Yet.
Cyborg anthropologist: "We can all be superhuman"
Electronics Made From Human Blood Cells Suggest Cyborg Interfaces, Spark Nightmares
Scientists Create Rat Cyborg With Artificial Cerebellum


Latest News from our Front Page

Galaxy Poll: 86 per cent of Australians want childhood vaccination to be compulsory?
2015-04-17 23:33
Australians want Prime Minister Tony Abbott to make childhood vaccination compulsory and close loopholes that allow vaccine refusers to put all children at risk. An exclusive national Galaxy poll commissioned by The Sunday Telegraph has revealed overwhelming support to ensure every child is vaccinated. The highest support for compulsory jabs is in South Australia, where 90 per cent support the call. The poll ...
Eye in the sky: Local police now using drones to spy on citizens
2015-04-17 22:09
The Harris County Precinct 1 Constable's Office is doing something that no other agency in Harris County is believed to have done yet: Use drones to help fight crime. It's an eye in the sky for law enforcement, without giving up the element of surprise. "It could absolutely save lives," says Constable Alan Rosen. Rosen says the agency's two new $1,200 drones, which ...
New Zealander of the Year: refuse vaccines, lose money
2015-04-17 22:47
Following in the footsteps of Australia, 2014 New Zealander of the Year, Dr. Lance O’Sullivan, wants to punish people who don’t get vaccinated. The New Zealand Herald (4/15) reports: “A leading New Zealand doctor has called on the Government to follow Australia’s example to cut child welfare payments to families who do not vaccinate their children, saying the policy would help protect ...
Iris Scanner Identifies a Person 40 Feet Away
2015-04-17 22:20
Police traffic stops are in the news again, tragically, sparking a new round of discussion on whether and how to outfit police with cameras and other technology. For several years now, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s CyLab Biometrics Center have been testing an iris recognition system that can be used to identify subjects at a range of up to 40 feet. Like ...
Yes, You Can Catch Insanity
2015-04-17 22:29
One day in March 2010, Isak McCune started clearing his throat with a forceful, violent sound. The New Hampshire toddler was 3, with a Beatles mop of blonde hair and a cuddly, loving personality. His parents had no idea where the guttural tic came from. They figured it was springtime allergies. Soon after, Isak began to scream as if in pain ...
More News »