Chief of FBI’s Boston office, key figure in marathon bombing investigation, stepping down
2013-06-12 0:00

By Denise Lavoie | Associated Press

The head of the FBI’s Boston office, one of the main law enforcement figures during the Boston Marathon bombing investigation, announced Tuesday that he’s stepping down to take a private-sector job.

Richard DesLauriers, who’s been special agent in charge of the office since July 2010, said he will leave next month after more than 26 years with the FBI. He said he has accepted a position as vice-president of corporate security with Penske Corp., a transportation services company, in Bloomfield Hills, Mich.

In an interview Tuesday, DesLauriers said he is most proud of his role in the apprehension of reputed mobster and longtime fugitive James “Whitey” Bulger; the arrests of two Boston-area Russian sleeper agents; the arrests and convictions of a man charged with conspiring to help al-Qaida and a man accused in a plot to fly remote-controlled model planes packed with explosives into the Pentagon and the U.S. Capitol; and the investigation into the deadly Boston Marathon bombing.

DesLauriers was one of the main faces of law enforcement during the intense, five-day manhunt that led to the capture of the sole surviving suspect following the April 15 marathon bombing, which killed three people.

DesLauriers, 53, four years younger than the mandatory retirement age for FBI agents, said he first learned of the Penske job in March but delayed his decision because of the bombing investigation.

“My time was coming down the pike sooner or later, so this was a good time to pursue an opportunity with a real world-class organization in the private sector,” he said.

Before moving to Boston, DesLauriers worked for the FBI in New York and Washington, earning broad experience in counterintelligence work. As special agent in charge of the Boston office, he oversaw the FBI in Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island.

[...]

Read the full article at: globalnews.ca











Related Articles
2 Agents From Team Involved in Tsarnaev’s Arrest Fall Out of Helicopter and Die
Man with ties to Boston bombing suspect shot, killed during FBI questioning
Father of unarmed slain man linked to Boston suspects wants FBI agents tried - Official story keeps changing
New York Times Warning: Trust Authorities on Boston Bombing, or You’re Nuts
DHS Admits Boston Training Drill Involving Backpack Explosives Planned Months Before Marathon
Did the FBI Just Bungle The Boston Bomb Plot, or Did It Actually Create It?


Latest News from our Front Page

Galaxy Poll: 86 per cent of Australians want childhood vaccination to be compulsory?
2015-04-17 23:33
Australians want Prime Minister Tony Abbott to make childhood vaccination compulsory and close loopholes that allow vaccine refusers to put all children at risk. An exclusive national Galaxy poll commissioned by The Sunday Telegraph has revealed overwhelming support to ensure every child is vaccinated. The highest support for compulsory jabs is in South Australia, where 90 per cent support the call. The poll ...
Eye in the sky: Local police now using drones to spy on citizens
2015-04-17 22:09
The Harris County Precinct 1 Constable's Office is doing something that no other agency in Harris County is believed to have done yet: Use drones to help fight crime. It's an eye in the sky for law enforcement, without giving up the element of surprise. "It could absolutely save lives," says Constable Alan Rosen. Rosen says the agency's two new $1,200 drones, which ...
New Zealander of the Year: refuse vaccines, lose money
2015-04-17 22:47
Following in the footsteps of Australia, 2014 New Zealander of the Year, Dr. Lance O’Sullivan, wants to punish people who don’t get vaccinated. The New Zealand Herald (4/15) reports: “A leading New Zealand doctor has called on the Government to follow Australia’s example to cut child welfare payments to families who do not vaccinate their children, saying the policy would help protect ...
Iris Scanner Identifies a Person 40 Feet Away
2015-04-17 22:20
Police traffic stops are in the news again, tragically, sparking a new round of discussion on whether and how to outfit police with cameras and other technology. For several years now, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s CyLab Biometrics Center have been testing an iris recognition system that can be used to identify subjects at a range of up to 40 feet. Like ...
Yes, You Can Catch Insanity
2015-04-17 22:29
One day in March 2010, Isak McCune started clearing his throat with a forceful, violent sound. The New Hampshire toddler was 3, with a Beatles mop of blonde hair and a cuddly, loving personality. His parents had no idea where the guttural tic came from. They figured it was springtime allergies. Soon after, Isak began to scream as if in pain ...
More News »