Earliest Primate Skeleton And ‘Cousin’ Of Human Ancestor Discovered In China
2013 06 07

From: AsianScientist

An international team of paleontologists has discovered a nearly complete, articulated skeleton of a tiny tree-dwelling primate in China.

An international team of paleontologists has discovered a nearly complete, articulated skeleton of a new tiny, tree-dwelling primate dating back 55 million years. The Eocene Epoch fossil, one of the most primitive primate fossils ever documented, was recovered from Hubei Province in central China.

The research team, led by Xijun Ni of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, describes the fossil in the latest edition of the journal, Nature.

Ni said that while doing fieldwork years ago in Hubei Province, he first came across the fossil, which had been found by a local farmer and was later donated to the IVPP. The fossil was encased within a rock and discovered after the rock was split open, yielding fossils and impressions of the primate on each side of the two halves.


A 3D, high-resolution reconstruction of the skeleton of Archicebus achilles, aided by X-ray

It was discovered in a quarry that had once been a lake and is known for producing ancient fish and bird fossils from the Eocene Epoch. The quarry is near Jingzhou City, south of the Yangtze River, and about 270 kilometers southwest of Wuhan City, the province capital.
“This region would have been a large series of lakes, surrounded by lush tropical forests during the early Eocene,” Ni said.

The fossil has been named Archicebus achilles. The genus, Archi, is Greek for the beginning, and the prefix is attached to cebus, which translates to “long-tailed monkey,” after the long tail of the fossil skeleton. The species name, Achilles, is an allusion to its interesting heel anatomy and named after the mythological Greek warrior, Achilles.
“Archicebus marks the first time that we have a reasonably complete picture of a primate close to the divergence between tarsiers and anthropoids,” Ni said. “It represents a big step forward in our efforts to chart the course of the earliest phases of primate and human evolution.”

The tiny primate has a body that is around 71 mm long and its estimated weight is around 20–30 grams, as small as a modern pygmy mouse lemur. Certain features of the skeleton suggest that the creature was a frequent leaper, favouring four-limbed grasp-leaping as a mode of transport. Small pointy teeth indicate that it ate insects. Large eye sockets indicate that the creature had good vision for hunting, but evidence points towards a diurnal rather than nocturnal activity pattern.

[...]

Read the full article at: asianscientist.com




Tune into Red Ice Radio:

Lloyd Pye, Brien Foerster & Jerry Wills - Hour 1 & 2 - Human Origins & Lost Races

Danny Vendramini - Hour 1 - Them & Us: Neanderthal Predation Theory

Troy McLachlan & Theodore Holden - Hour 1 - Cosmos in Collision: Antique Solar System, Neanderthals & Modern Man

Lloyd Pye - Human Origins, Intervention Theory & Genetic Experimentation

Lloyd Pye - The Annunaki & Genetic Engineering

Lloyd Pye - The Starchild Skull Update

Lloyd Pye - Extraction of Nuclear DNA from the Starchild Skull

Lloyd Pye - The Intervention Theory





Related Articles
The palaeontologist who brought fossil Ida to the world (2009)
Why Ida fossil is not the missing link (2009)
Media touts new fossil hominid as Missing Link
Fossil from the ’last dinosaur’ proves species WAS wiped out by killer asteroid, say scientists
The Red Deer People - Human fossils hint at new species
Is Nova Scotia fossil ‘Superstar’ from an early human ancestor?
Mammoth hunt: Perfectly preserved Siberian mammoth fossils spread cloning rumor


Latest News from our Front Page

Norway Joins the Race to Develop Killer Robots
2014 10 24
Norway is a large exporter of weapons, which makes the resolution of the debate about creating killer robots an important issue for everyone.  One could debate the overall merits or failings of robotic systems, but an area that clearly has become a point for concern on all sides is the emergence of "killer robots." According to robotics pioneer, David Hanson, ...
Gene That Once Aided Survival in the Arctic Found to Have Negative Impact on Health Today
2014 10 23
In individuals living in the Arctic, researchers have discovered a gene variant that arose thousands of years ago and most likely provided an evolutionary advantage for processing high-fat diets or for surviving in a cold environment; however, the variant also seems to increase the risk of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, and infant mortality in today’s northern populations. {snip} “Our work ...
The Ebola hoax: questions, answers, and the false belief in the “One It”
2014 10 23
“The Reality Manufacturing Company doesn’t just sell ‘fake paintings’ that are easy to spot. No. They also sell images that are geared to mesh with people’s deeply held instincts and thereby produce rigid false beliefs. People are sure that if they gave up such beliefs, their world would fall apart and blow away in the wind.” ...
New Controversial Theory Suggests "Hobbits" Were Not Human - Who Were These Mysterious Beings?
2014 10 23
The origin of the Hobbit species remains a challenging subject to scientists. The Hobbit’s discovery confirmed the view that the Earth was once populated by many species of human, but new research the Hobbit’s were not human at all! So, who were these mysterious beings? Where did they come from? The idea that our species, Homo sapiens, was the only species of human on ...
Right into enemy hands? ISIS shows off new weapons allegedly airdropped by US (VIDEO)
2014 10 23
Islamic State has published a new video in which a jihadist shows off brand-new American hardware, which was purportedly intended for the Kurds they are fighting in the Syrian border town of Kobani. The undated video, posted by the unofficial IS mouthpiece “a3maq news”, sees a jihadist showing several boxes of munitions with English-language markings, with a parachute spread out on ...
More News »