Jupiter’s moons give better chances in finding life than Mars
2013-05-29 0:00

By Eko Armunanto | DigitalJournal


A new mission called JUICE may give better chances in finding life elsewhere in the Solar System as actual living organisms, compared to the desiccated and irradiated remnants of long dead microbes that scientists hope to find on the Red Planet

The closest findings to what space scientists termed Alien Civilization have been reported last week telling about the discovery of another water-weathered rock in Mars, an insinuation that the Red Planet could have supported life in its ancient past. Scientists identified sulfur, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and carbon in the powder drilled out of a sedimentary rock near an ancient stream bed in Gale Crater on the Red Planet last month. "A fundamental question for this mission is whether Mars could have supported a habitable environment," said Michael Meyer, NASA’s lead scientist for Mars Exploration Program at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. "From what we know now, the answer is yes."

A new mission called JUICE, by European Space Agency (ESA), may however give better chances in finding life elsewhere in the Solar System, as actual living organisms – not the desiccated and irradiated remnants of long dead microbes that scientists hope to find on the Red Planet. JUICE (JUpiter ICy moons Explorer), aimed at launching in 2022, will spend at least three years studying Jupiter’s moons for signs of life. It will be launched from Europe’s spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. JUICE is the first large-class mission chosen as part of ESA’s Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program.

What’s in Jupiter’s moons that attract scientists in their space explorations? Jupiter has amazingly dozens of moons and enormous magnetic field “to form a kind of miniature solar system,” as NASA puts it. Jupiter’s four largest moons are named Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto – each of them is a distinctive world. Those four moons were discovered by Galileo, so then called The Galilean Satellites. More than just “have water”, Jupiter’s moon Europa is thought to have water twice as much as does Earth. This moon intrigues astrobiologists because of its potential for having a habitable zone. Its interior is hot which keeps the water comparatively warm and pulsing like rivers on Earth, or even waving like ocean.

“If that doesn’t sound like a place that could cook up life, nothing does”, says Michael D. Lemonick on TIME. He said the only ingredients missing to make Europa’s ocean a potential home to living things have been salt and organic compounds – but now, according to a study about to be published in The Astronomical Journal, they’re not missing anymore. A dip in the waters of Europa, the paper concludes, could be very much like a dip in our oceans, perhaps with all the biology that implies.

[...]

Read the full article at: digitaljournal.com



Related Articles
Mars One says 80,000 have applied for one-way mission to red planet
Mars Announcement Raises Question: What Is Life?
Mars once had water warm enough to sustain life
Did NASA find life on Mars in 1976, and then cook it?
A Return To Mars And the Mysterious Monolith


Latest News from our Front Page

Galaxy Poll: 86 per cent of Australians want childhood vaccination to be compulsory?
2015-04-17 23:33
Australians want Prime Minister Tony Abbott to make childhood vaccination compulsory and close loopholes that allow vaccine refusers to put all children at risk. An exclusive national Galaxy poll commissioned by The Sunday Telegraph has revealed overwhelming support to ensure every child is vaccinated. The highest support for compulsory jabs is in South Australia, where 90 per cent support the call. The poll ...
Eye in the sky: Local police now using drones to spy on citizens
2015-04-17 22:09
The Harris County Precinct 1 Constable's Office is doing something that no other agency in Harris County is believed to have done yet: Use drones to help fight crime. It's an eye in the sky for law enforcement, without giving up the element of surprise. "It could absolutely save lives," says Constable Alan Rosen. Rosen says the agency's two new $1,200 drones, which ...
New Zealander of the Year: refuse vaccines, lose money
2015-04-17 22:47
Following in the footsteps of Australia, 2014 New Zealander of the Year, Dr. Lance O’Sullivan, wants to punish people who don’t get vaccinated. The New Zealand Herald (4/15) reports: “A leading New Zealand doctor has called on the Government to follow Australia’s example to cut child welfare payments to families who do not vaccinate their children, saying the policy would help protect ...
Iris Scanner Identifies a Person 40 Feet Away
2015-04-17 22:20
Police traffic stops are in the news again, tragically, sparking a new round of discussion on whether and how to outfit police with cameras and other technology. For several years now, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s CyLab Biometrics Center have been testing an iris recognition system that can be used to identify subjects at a range of up to 40 feet. Like ...
Yes, You Can Catch Insanity
2015-04-17 22:29
One day in March 2010, Isak McCune started clearing his throat with a forceful, violent sound. The New Hampshire toddler was 3, with a Beatles mop of blonde hair and a cuddly, loving personality. His parents had no idea where the guttural tic came from. They figured it was springtime allergies. Soon after, Isak began to scream as if in pain ...
More News »