Luddites: They raged against the machine and lost
2013-01-25 0:00

By Paul Wiseman | AssociatedPress

Their name is synonymous with futile attempts to roll back technology _ and with fuddy-duddies who canít figure out how to use the iPhone.

The Luddites were British textile artisans who 200 years ago smashed the mechanized looms they thought threatened their jobs.

They werenít the first to attack machines. They are named after a man who probably didnít exist. And their grievances werenít even with the looms themselves; they were enraged at the business owners who hired unskilled laborers to use the machines and turn out shoddy products that ruined the artisansí reputation for quality.

Their movement began in economic misery. Britainís long war with Napoleon had taken a toll. The economy was squeezed by a French blockade that cut exports and sent food prices soaring. Their livelihoods threatened by low-wage labor, the artisans began demonstrating around Nottingham in 1811.

The protests _ and the machine-busting _ spread across a swath of central England. Some of the Luddites swung hammers forged by a blacksmith named Enoch Taylor, who also made machinery for their adversaries, mill owners. "Enoch made them," the Luddites would say. "So Enoch shall break them."

An outraged Parliament passed a law imposing the death penalty on machine wreckers _ a draconian move opposed by the poet Lord Byron, who said the Luddites deserved pity, not punishment.


This publicly distributed illustration from 1812 shows frame-breakers, or Luddites, smashing a loom. The Luddites were British textile artisans who 200 years ago smashed the mechanized looms they thought threatened their jobs. Machine-breaking was criminalized by the Parliament of the United Kingdom as early as 1721, but the Frame-Breaking Act 1812 made the death penalty available.

The government sent soldiers to restore order. At one point, the late historian Eric Hobsbawm has written, Britain had more troops deployed against the Luddites than (they) it had fighting Napoleon in Spain and Portugal.

Several Luddites were killed in clashes with troops. Others were hanged. By the end of 1814, the Luddite protests were over. The Industrial Revolution rolled on, replacing artisans with factory workers.

But the Luddites had made quite an impression. They had a talent for showmanship. They wrote mischievous, official-sounding decrees addressed from Sherwood Forest, an attempt to claim the legacy of Robin Hood. They marched through the streets dressed as women, claiming to be "General Luddís wives."

But there was no General Ludd.

Historians arenít sure where the name came from. Years earlier, by one account, a young apprentice named Ned Ludd had smashed the machine he was working on after being punished by his master. But in other accounts, the boyís name is Ludlum. And in his book on the Luddites, "Rebels Against the Future," author Kirkpatrick Sale suggests the term may have come from an expression used then in parts of England _ "sent all of a lud," which meant ruined.

Whatever its origins, the name stuck.

The Luddite label has been applied to everyone from anti-technology extremists _ such as the "Unabomber," Ted Kaczynski _ to those who merely struggle with technology or donít want to bother with it. "Iím a Luddite," pop star Elton John told Britainís The Telegraph newspaper in 2011. "I donít have a phone. I donít have a computer. I donít have an iPad. And I donít have an iPod."

Sometimes the Luddite label serves as an all-purpose epithet for someone whoís not with the times. When University of Chicago economist Raghuram Rajan raised unwelcome questions about the stability of the world financial system in 2005, for instance, former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers dismissed his argument as "slightly Luddite."

Three years later, investment bank Lehman Bros. collapsed, and the global economy toppled into the deepest recession since the 1930s.

For once, at least, the Luddite was right.


Article from: missoulian.com












Related Articles
Gore And The Great Luddite Hoax Of 2007
What the Luddites Really Fought Against
"Ghost Exchange" film questions runaway stock market technology
Was human technology superior to neanderthalsí?
Transhumansm; Merging With Technology


Latest News from our Front Page

Murder Rates Rising Sharply in Many U.S. Cities
2015-09-01 23:33
Cities across the nation are seeing a startling rise in murders after years of declines, and few places have witnessed a shift as precipitous as this city [Milwaukee]. With the summer not yet over, 104 people have been killed this year‚Äďafter 86 homicides in all of 2014. More than 30 other cities have also reported increases in violence from a year ...
Bulgaria - Islamic State Terrorists Caught Crossing Into Europe Posing As Refugees
2015-09-01 23:47
Bulgarian authorities near the Gyueshevo border checkpoint detained the five men, aged between 20 and 24, late on Wednesday, Bulgarian broadcaster NOVA TV reported. The men were stopped by a border guard, who they attempted to bribe with a “wad of dollars.” However, they were searched and Islamic State propaganda, specific Jihadists prayers and decapitation videos were found on their phones. In ...
How This NY Mom Made the Case for Her Son’s Religious Vaccine Exemption
2015-09-01 22:27
An unidentified, Russian immigrant mother who practices the Russian Orthodox faith, has secured a religious vaccine exemption for her autistic son. New York has a bill on the table to eliminate religious exemption and to root out those who weren’t refusing vaccines on strictly devout, religious grounds. Yet, this woman’s plight goes back before talk of eliminating the exemption – two ...
Wall Street Panics Over Global Recession Fears
2015-09-01 21:18
Chinese factories slow down significantly Wall Street plunged Tuesday after investors feared weak data from China, the world’s second-largest economy, would lead to a global recession. China’s manufacturing sector suffered its quickest deterioration in over six years, leading to a three-year market low and other sectors of the Chinese economy also slowed down significantly. In response, all three major U.S. stock indices, the ...
Thousands of Icelanders Have Volunteered to Take Syrian Refugees Into Their Homes
2015-09-01 21:47
The Icelandic government says it is now looking into increasing its refugee quota More than 11,000 Icelanders have offered to take Syrian refugees into their homes, after their government said it would accept only 50 people this year. A Facebook event created Sunday by Icelandic author and professor Bryndis Bjorgvinsdottir encouraged members of the public to call on the government to increase ...
More News »