IBM Watson Starts using Swear Words, Gets HardDrive Wiped by Creators
2013-01-18 0:00

By Ravi Mandalia | ParityNews.com



IBM has learned a rather strange lesson when it comes to teaching artificial intelligence (AI) enabled supercomputers to understand the subtlety of slangs used humans as it was recently revealed by Eric Brown that they had to develop a filter to keep Watson from swearing.

The head researcher at IBM had an idea of training Watson to understand natural language as he believed that ability to understand slangs would probably be an ultimate test that would ensure that Watson could understand the way real people communicate. To put this into practice Watson was made to learn the Urban Dictionary.

There was a slight problem though as the dictionary was made up of swear words along with nasty and dirty words which the Watson learned as well. The end result “Watson couldn’t distinguish between polite language and profanity -- which the Urban Dictionary is full of”, revealed Brown in an interview with Fortune Magazine.

“Watson picked up some bad habits from reading Wikipedia as well. In tests it even used the word "bullshit" in an answer to a researcher’s query”, he added.

To stop Watson from using the cuss words, Brown not only had to develop a filter that would stop the supercomputer from swearing but also had to scrape the entire Urban Dictionary from the computer’s memory.

Article from: paritynews.com





Swearing May be Good for Us – Study Shows

We’re taught not to swear in several stages throughout life, especially as children. In a wide number of social and formal situations, using expletives can in fact land someone in quite a bit of trouble. But when we’re by ourselves and under stress, the ability to yelp out a forbidden word or two might be more therapeutic than it would seem on the surface. This idea is perhaps most prevalent in those instances where we stub a toe or otherwise accidentally hurt ourselves, one of the most popular instances in which people let loose with swear words. Drawing on this common occurrence, a team at Keele University in Blightly has performed a study, with interesting implications for the worlds of psychology and pain relief.

The study was a delicate operation –after all, asking participants to endure a bit of pain and then sound off with words they’ve been instructed not to utter in the presence of others is a lofty quest, even in the academic environment. But the study met this challenge with the use of icy water. Participants were asked to submerge their hands into the water, and some subjects were encouraged to let out any “bad words” that came to mind, while others were limited to saying something defined as non-offensive. The results proved interesting: those who swore reported less pain, and on average were able to endure submersion for forty seconds longer than their clean-mouthed counterparts.

While it isn’t exactly cause for replacing every other word with something deliciously uncouth, the study does suggest that allowing ourselves a greater range of speech in times of stress –which may include therapy sessions– may be helpful in allowing us to work past our basic sensory barriers.

Source: GoodTherapy.org






A few videos from George Carlin, Semantics Expert:
(Warning, NSFW LANGUAGE)
















Related Articles
George Carlin - Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television
Sex, swearing and who’s really to blame for our children’s lost innocence
IBM supercomputer Watson to assist doctors
IBM’s Watson Wins Everytime. Or Else. (Satire)
Human Intelligence not in Jeopardy: Congressman tops computer Watson
Man Versus Machine: IBM’s ’Watson’ computer takes on humans


Latest News from our Front Page

Galaxy Poll: 86 per cent of Australians want childhood vaccination to be compulsory?
2015-04-17 23:33
Australians want Prime Minister Tony Abbott to make childhood vaccination compulsory and close loopholes that allow vaccine refusers to put all children at risk. An exclusive national Galaxy poll commissioned by The Sunday Telegraph has revealed overwhelming support to ensure every child is vaccinated. The highest support for compulsory jabs is in South Australia, where 90 per cent support the call. The poll ...
Eye in the sky: Local police now using drones to spy on citizens
2015-04-17 22:09
The Harris County Precinct 1 Constable's Office is doing something that no other agency in Harris County is believed to have done yet: Use drones to help fight crime. It's an eye in the sky for law enforcement, without giving up the element of surprise. "It could absolutely save lives," says Constable Alan Rosen. Rosen says the agency's two new $1,200 drones, which ...
New Zealander of the Year: refuse vaccines, lose money
2015-04-17 22:47
Following in the footsteps of Australia, 2014 New Zealander of the Year, Dr. Lance O’Sullivan, wants to punish people who don’t get vaccinated. The New Zealand Herald (4/15) reports: “A leading New Zealand doctor has called on the Government to follow Australia’s example to cut child welfare payments to families who do not vaccinate their children, saying the policy would help protect ...
Iris Scanner Identifies a Person 40 Feet Away
2015-04-17 22:20
Police traffic stops are in the news again, tragically, sparking a new round of discussion on whether and how to outfit police with cameras and other technology. For several years now, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s CyLab Biometrics Center have been testing an iris recognition system that can be used to identify subjects at a range of up to 40 feet. Like ...
Yes, You Can Catch Insanity
2015-04-17 22:29
One day in March 2010, Isak McCune started clearing his throat with a forceful, violent sound. The New Hampshire toddler was 3, with a Beatles mop of blonde hair and a cuddly, loving personality. His parents had no idea where the guttural tic came from. They figured it was springtime allergies. Soon after, Isak began to scream as if in pain ...
More News »