Who stabbed him in the back? Scan reveals 5,500-year-old mummy murder mystery
2012 11 16

By Mark Prigg and Damien Gayle | DailyMail.co.uk




An ancient mummy who has been on display in the British Museum for over 100 years was a young man murdered by a killer who stabbed him in the back, new research shows.

Scans of the ancient Egyptian, known officially as Gebelein man but nicknamed Ginger for his red hair, show that a puncture just beneath his left shoulderblade was made by his murderer.

Forensic experts studied the scan on a ’virtual autopsy table’ concluded that there is almost no doubt he was the victim of a deliberate, violent killing in peacetime.


The Gebelein Man, also known as Ginger for his red hair, a 5,500-year-old mummy displayed in the British Museum. Researchers have found a wound on his back was caused by his murderer


Daniel Antoine, the museum’s expert on human remains, told The Times: ’His left shoulderblade is slightly damaged.

’You can see that the rib immediately under the shoulderblade has been shattered in such a way that it has splintered into his tissue.

’This shows immense force.

’The force is such that the blade would have penetrated through his lung.’






Examinations also showed he was a young man, aged between just 18 and 20 when he was killed, and impressively muscled.

Mr Antoine said he believes a lack of defensive wounds suggest Ginger was the victim of a surprise attack.

A blade of copper or sharpened flint at least 5in long and 0.7in wide made the injury, he said.

The way that Ginger’s shattered bones remained in the soft tissue surrounding them indicates the injury took place while he was alive.


Forensic investigation: Scientists examined Ginger using a computer axial tomography (CAT) scanner, with just 30 seconds of scans giving them enough data for a detailed investigation of his insides



New display: From today visitors can use a touch screen to look inside Ginger’s body to see if there are any other clues about his life and death


Professor Anders Persson of the Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), a Forensic Radiology expert, who also uses the virtual autopsy system for criminal and accident cases in Sweden, confirmed the British Museum’s assessment that the force of the blow was such that it also shattered the rib immediately below the shoulder blade, embedding bone fragments into his muscle tissue, and injuring the left lung and surrounding blood vessels.

The absence of any signs of healing and the severity of the injuries suggest that this can be considered the cause of death.

The body, the London museum’s most popular attraction after the Rosetta Stone, has rarely been moved since first being put on display in 1901.

[...]


For more photos and to read the full article, go to: dailymail.co.uk




Related Articles
Understanding Ancient Egyptian Chronology
DNA of Hungarian mummies may help combat tuberculosis
Company Offers Pet Mummification Service
Scottish prehistoric mummies made from jigsaw of body parts
France hands back Maori mummified head to New Zealand
Mummy with Mouthful of Cavities Discovered
Powdered Mummy, Gladiator Blood, and other Historical Medicines Made from Human Corpses
Mummy Was No Lady
Vegetative man tells doctors ‘I’m not in pain’ via MRI communication
Scientists Record Human Childbirth With MRI For First Time
Scanning Dead Salmon in fMRI Machine Highlights Risk of Red Herrings


Latest News from our Front Page

Agenda 21: The BLM Land Grabbing Endgame
2014 04 23
Why is the federal government so obsessed with grabbing more land? After all, the federal government already owns more than 40 percent of the land in 9 different U.S. states. Why are federal bureaucrats so determined to grab even more? Well, the truth is that this all becomes much clearer once you understand that there is a ...
Fukushima radiation killing children, government hiding the truth
2014 04 22
Katsutaka Idogawa, former mayor of Futaba, a town near the disabled Fukushima nuclear plant, is warning his country that radiation contamination is affecting Japan’s greatest treasure - its children. Asked about government plans to relocate the people of Fatuba to the city of Iwaki, inside the Fukushima prefecture, Idogawa criticized the move as a "violation of human rights." Compared with Chernobyl, radiation ...
Why your fingerprints may not be unique
2014 04 22
Assumption that everyone has a unique fingerprint from which they can be identified through a computer database is flawed, says Home Office expert Mike Silverman Fingerprint evidence linking criminals to crime scenes has played a fundamental role in convictions in Britain since the first forensic laboratory was set up in Scotland Yard in 1901. But the basic assumption that everyone has a ...
Asteroids cause dozens of nuclear-scale blasts in Earth’s atmosphere
2014 04 22
Asteroids caused 26 nuclear-scale explosions in the Earth’s atmosphere between 2000 and 2013, a new report reveals. Some were more powerful – in one case, dozens of times stronger – than the atom bomb blast that destroyed Hiroshima in 1945 with an energy yield equivalent to 16 kilotons of TNT. Most occurred too high in the atmosphere to cause any serious damage ...
‘Editing DNA’ to eliminate genetic conditions now a reality
2014 04 22
Scientists have employed a revolutionary genome-editing computer technique that accurately identifies one faulty genetic “letter” among billions and effortlessly repairs a genetic condition in animals, paving way for human trials. The success, by MIT in Boston, is the latest achievement in the field of genome editing that has been catapulted into the spotlight through a technology that can pinpoint genetic faults ...
More News »