Egypt’s ‘collapsing’ pyramids
2012 10 29

By Peter James | Past Horizons

My first introduction to working in Egypt was a project in Cairo’s historic old quarter, following the 1992 earthquake that caused widespread and devastating damage. Cintec International won the contract to repair and reinforce a number of badly affected structures, with work commencing in 1998.

The project consisted of some 15 notable mosques and maqaads, successfully strengthened using Cintec’s patented anchoring systems. Most of the essential work was completed by early 2005, with ongoing localised repairs still being undertaken as and when required.

Reinforcing the Temple of Hibis

Following the success of the project in the old quarter, Cintec was requested to provide internal reinforcement to the Temple of Hibis in the El-Kharga Oasis, 700 kilometres due south of Cairo. Construction on the Temple began in 672 BC, with additions and improvements made by various Pharaohs until 68 AD. Due to poor soil conditions, the temple had differential settlement problems. This was unusual for pharaonic structures, as the Egyptians had by this time been building very large constructions for many centuries without any foundation problems.


Repair work on the Temple of Hibis.


Work on the temple needed to solve two main problems. One was to isolate the structure from the existing water table, a project undertaken very efficiently by Arab Contractors and the Antiquity Consultants. Secondly, having successfully isolated the structure from the prevailing water, the temple needed to be secured internally without any intervention being visible. This was a particularly difficult operation, due to the extensive wall paintings and hieroglyphic carvings on both internal and external walls. Innovative diamond drilling and reinforcing techniques, developed and patented by Cintec, were required to solve these problems, and were successfully implemented with no damage to the splendour and history of the monument.


[...]

Read the full article at: pasthorizonspr.com








Related Articles


Latest News from our Front Page

Sweden Recognizes Palestinian State; Israel Upset
2014 10 31
Sweden on Thursday became the biggest Western European country to recognize a Palestinian state, prompting a strong protest from Israel, which swiftly withdrew its ambassador from Stockholm. The move by Sweden’s new left-leaning government reflects growing international impatience with Israel’s nearly half-century control of the West Bank, east Jerusalem and its blockade of the Gaza Strip. It also comes during increased ...
Fed-Backed Study: How to Brainwash Public into Fearing “Climate Change” Like Ebola
2014 10 31
$84K study seeks ways to make public fear "climate change and overpopulation" The National Science Foundation is funding a study to determine how to brainwash the public into fearing “climate change and overpopulation” as if they were Ebola. The NSF awarded an $84,000 grant to researchers at the State University of New York at Buffalo yesterday to figure out how to make ...
Brain decoder can eavesdrop on your inner voice
2014 10 31
As you read this, your neurons are firing – that brain activity can now be decoded to reveal the silent words in your head TALKING to yourself used to be a strictly private pastime. That’s no longer the case – researchers have eavesdropped on our internal monologue for the first time. The achievement is a step towards helping people who cannot ...
6 Million Lies
2014 10 30
“If you do not specify and confront real issues, what you say will surely obscure them. If you do not alarm anyone morally, you yourself remain morally asleep. If you do not embody controversy, what you say will be an acceptance of the drift of the coming hell.” C Wright Mills. I need to share information I have discovered ...
Google’s New Computer With Human-Like Learning Abilities Will Program Itself
2014 10 30
In college, it wasn’t rare to hear a verbal battle regarding artificial intelligence erupt between my friends studying neuroscience and my friends studying computer science. One rather outrageous fellow would mention the possibility of a computer takeover, and off they went. The neuroscience-savvy would awe at the potential of such hybrid technology as the CS majors argued we have nothing to ...
More News »