The other Da Vinci code: did Leonardo paint himself into The Last Supper?
2012-08-21 0:00

By Dalya Alberge | Independent.co.uk

For years scholars have wondered what he looked like. But was the answer staring them in the face all along?


The Last Supper: James the Lesser/Leonardo, second from left. Thomas/Leonardo, sixth from right, with extended finger



It is a question that has fascinated art historians: what did Leonardo da Vinci look like?

The Renaissance genius left no youthful self-portraits, although academics have long suspected that he may have inserted his likeness into one of his own masterpieces.

But now one art expert has proposed a tantalising new theory that Leonardo actually depicted himself, twice, in The Last Supper, one of arts most famous paintings.

Ross King, the author of the international bestseller Brunelleschis Dome, believes Leonardo used his own face for the apostles Thomas and James the Lesser in the 500-year-old mural in Milan.

His evidence lies partly in a little-known poem written in the 1490s when Leonardo was painting The Last Supper. Its author, Gasparo Visconti, was a friend of the artist and, like him, a Sforza court employee.

In humorous verse, Visconti mocks an unnamed artist for putting his self-portrait into his paintings "however handsome it may be" and with his own "actions and ways", namely gestures and expressions.

Leonardos own good looks were legendary, recorded by his 16th century biographer, Giorgio Vasari, as "endowed by heaven with beauty, grace and talent". And Thomass upraised finger gesture in the painting was viewed by contemporaries as a Leonardo trademark.

Dr King also points to a red chalk drawing, believed to depict Leonardo around 1515, sketched by one of his assistants. It shows a classically handsome man with a Greek nose, flowing hair and a long beard "a rare sight on the chins of 15th century Italians", he notes. In The Last Supper, Thomas to the right of Christ and James the Lesser second from left are reminiscent of that image both with a Greek nose, flowing hair and a beard.

Dr King told The Independent: "The Last Supper is the only work that no one either crackpot or academic has tried to identify as a Leonardo portrait."

Bloomsbury Publishing will publish his latest research in Leonardo and The Last Supper on 30 August, coinciding with its choice as BBC Radio 4s Book of the Week.

Little of Leonardos original mural, painted for the refectory of the Santa Maria delle Grazie monastery, survives today. Besides deteri oration, Allied bombing exposed it to the elements and its subsequent restoration left critics divided.

In his book, Dr King writes that "Leonardo-spotting has become a popular pastime" with numerous supposed identifications. He adds that the most famous is the supposed self-portrait of an old man in red chalk. However, as it is now believed to date from the 1490s contemporary with The Last Supper it cannot be a self-portrait.

Charles Nicholl, the noted Leonardo scholar, said: "Of all the apostles that [Leonardo] would wish to be identified with, I think Doubting Thomas would be top of his list because Leonardo was a great believer in asking questions rather than accepting what people tell you."


Article from: independent.co.uk



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