Anders Breivik Norway Attack: Police & Intelligence Criticised
2012-08-14 0:00

By Brit Dee | ResistRadio.com





Norwegian police have been heavily criticised by an independent commission, who have concluded that Anders Breivik’s bomb attack could have been prevented, and his mass shooting on the island of Utøya stopped much earlier.

Breivik’s July 22nd 2011 bomb attack on the government building in Oslo could have been prevented, states the government-appointed commission report, "through effective implementation of already adopted security measures".

Breivik was able to park a van containing a fertiliser bomb outside the building, which exploded killing 8 and injuring many more. The report says that a scenario envisaging a car bombing

at the government complex and several coordinated attacks have been recurring scenarios in threat assessments as well as for safety analyses and exercise scenarios for many years.

Today’s report also criticises the police response to Breivik’s subsequent gun rampage on Utøya, where he was able to spend well over an hour killing 69 members of the Labour Party youth organisation.

Norwegian police made a number of errors, including struggling to find transport to reach the island, which slowed down their response. An inflatable dinghy became overloaded when an anti-terror team tried to sail to Utøya, whilst the private boats that eventually transported police to the island took a route that was 3 km longer than the shortest crossing point. The Norwegian police’s only helicopter could not be used because its crew were on holiday.

The police response was also hampered by a flawed communications system. During the recent trial Breivik’s attorney claimed that his client had called the police ten times whilst on Utøya, reaching them twice, when he stated his name and said he wanted to surrender. When police did not call back or appear at the scene, Breivik decided to continue his shooting spree. It took police 1 hour and 19 minutes to eventually apprehend and arrest him.

The Norwegian domestic intelligence service has also been criticised in the report, with the commission stating that they could have done more to track the killer down. Anders Breivik had been on the intelligence service’s radar months before the attack, his name appearing on a watch list after he bought chemicals online from a Polish retailer, subsequently used to create the bomb detonated on 22/7.


Article from: resistradio.com


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