Scientists ’95% Sure’ Bigfoot Lives in Russian Tundra
2011 10 17

By Joe Jackson | TIME.com



Scientists and yeti enthusiasts believe there may finally be solid evidence that the apelike creature roams the vast Siberian tundra, reports the Guardian.
A team of a dozen-plus experts from as far afield as Canada and Sweden have proclaimed themselves 95% certain of the mythical animal’s existence after a daylong conference in the town of Tashtagol in the Kemerovo region, some 2,000 miles east of Moscow. In recent years, locals there have reported sightings of the yeti, also known as the abominable snowman.


The Kemerovo government announced on Oct. 10 that a two-day expedition the previous weekend to the region’s Azassky cave and Karatag peak "collected irrefutable evidence" of yetis’ existence on the wintry plateau.

"Conference participants came to the conclusion that the artifacts found give 95% evidence of the habitation of the ’snow man’ on Kemerovo region territory," read a statement. "In one of the detected tracks, Russian scientist Anatoly Fokin noted several hairs that might belong to the yeti," it added. The group also discovered footprints, a presumed bed and various other markers.


The scientific community has historically disputed the existence of the yeti given scant conclusive evidence. But numerous sightings of such creatures have been reported in Himalayan countries and in North America, where it is known as Sasquatch, or bigfoot.

Article from: time.com
Top Image: Sasquatch from Roger Patterson film, 1967


10 Beasts That Used To Be Mythical



Tales of the Sasquatch abound in the Pacific Northwest — in both the U.S. and Canada. This 2011 Sasquatch coin from the Royal Canadian Mint is part of a three-coin series of Canadian Mythical Creatures — although the folks who’ve seen him wouldn’t say he’s mythical! The coin shows the 10-foot ape-man looking up at you from the forest floor. It comes in a colorful folder showing the Sasquatch’s range. Link




Siberia home to yeti, bigfoot enthusiasts insist
By Miriam Elder | Guardian.co.uk


Image: Source

The vast Siberian tundra holds untold mysteries, from once-secret nuclear installations to alleged UFO crash sites.

Now, a team of scientists say they are "95%" sure that Russia’s wintry expanse is home to the mythical yeti, otherwise known as the abominable snowman.

More than a dozen scientists and yeti enthusiasts flew in from Canada, Estonia, Sweden and the US to exchange findings with their Russian counterparts at a day-long conference in the town of Tashtagol, some 2,000 miles east of Moscow in the Kemerovo region. Locals there have reported an increase in sightings of a creature in recent years.

A two-day expedition to the region’s Azassky cave and Karatag peak over the weekend "collected irrefutable evidence" of the yeti’s existence there, the Kemerovo government claimed in a statement. "In one of the detected tracks, Russian scientist Anatoly Fokin noted several hairs that might belong to the yeti," it added. Scientists also found footprints, a presumed bed and various other markers.

"Conference participants came to the conclusion that the artefacts found give 95% evidence of the habitation of the ’snow man’ on Kemerovo region territory," the statement said.

[...]

Read the full article at: guardian.co.uk



Video from: YouTube.com




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