Amy Winehouse joins 27 Club
2011 07 24

From: timesofindia.indiatimes.com




One of the greatest mysteries of modern rock’n’roll history seems to have manifested itself again in the death of 27-year-old soul singer Amy Winehouse.

27 Club

forever27.co.uk

The multiple-Grammy winning artiste, who shot to fame for hits like "Rehab", "Stronger Than Me" and "Love Is A Losing Game", was most famous for her tryst with drugs and alcohol. Her death will heighten the enigma around one of the most unsettling phenomena in the history of music - Amy’s joined Brian Jones (the guitarist of Rolling Stones), Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain, Janis Joplin and Jim Morrison, all among 38 famous musicians who died at the young age of 27. The 27 Club, also known as Forever 27, has seen stars die of drug overdose, freak accidents, suicides, and even murder. Hendrix’s biographer Charles R Cross wrote, "The number of musicians who died at 27 is truly remarkable by any standard. Humans die regularly at all ages... there is a statistical spike for musicians who die at 27."

Amy, who was found dead in her apartment in north London on July 23, had a long and troubled relationship with drugs like cocaine and heroin, and alcohol.

The soul singer saw many cancelled tours like the recent 12-stop European one, where she was booed off-stage in Siberia as she struggled to remember her own music lyrics. Amy, who was discovered at the age of 16, was constantly shuttling in and out of rehabs and suffered heartbreaks in the shape of ex-husband Blake Civil Fielder, who allegedly introduced her to cocaine and heroin.

"If you can’t sort something out for yourself, no one can help you," Amy had once said, and this caught up with her as the singer struggled to overcome drug abuse. Although the police have not yet been able to explain her death, it’s speculated that it was substance abuse. A few months back, her friends had said that doctors had warned the singer, who was famous for her beehive hairdo and heavy eye makeup that if she did not give up drugs and alcohol, her life could end soon. And before the beginning of her last tour in May 2011, Amy visited the London Priory Clinic for her addictions. She also suffered from mental health issues, one of them being depression. "Since I was 16, I’ve felt a black cloud hangs over me. Since then, I have taken pills for depression," she had said once.

Twitter exploded within minutes of the news of her death. Actress Sonam Kapoor tweeted, "#rip Amy winehouse for all the demons you faced I hope you at last have found your peace. I loved your big voice and your music. love & peace." Hollywood actress Demi Moore wrote, "Truly sad news about Amy Winehouse. My heart goes out to her family. May her troubled soul find peace." And hubby Ashton Kutcher tried to grapple for the right sentiments, "I nevr know wht 2 post after paying respect 2 sum1 who died. Just seems lk anything funny is inappropriate. mayB I’ll just go C HarryPotter. (sic)." She had once said, "If I died tomorrow, I would be a happy girl." Hope she got that. Rest in peace, Amy Winehouse.

We’re watching her kill herself slowly: mom
In a 2008 interview, Janis, Amy Winheouse’s mother, had said that her daughter could be dead within the year. "I’ve known for a long time that my daughter has problems. But seeing it on screen rammed it home. I realise my daughter could be dead within the year. We’re watching her kill herself, slowly. I’ve already come to terms with her death. I’ve steeled myself to ask her what ground she wants to be buried in, which cemetery. Because the drugs will get her if she stays on this road. I look at Heath Ledger and Britney. She’s on their path. It’s like watching a car crash - this person throwing all these gifts away," she’d said.

Source: timesofindia.indiatimes.com



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