Japan moves "giant step" toward resolving nuclear crisis
2011-06-27 0:00

By Kiyoshi Takenaka and Michael Watson | Reuters.ca


The operator of Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant moved closer to ending its radiation crisis on Monday with the start of a system to cool damaged reactors that could also help avoid dumping highly contaminated water into the Pacific Ocean.

The move was hailed as "a giant step forward" by Goshi Hosono, an adviser to Prime Minister Naoto Kan.

"This is critical in two aspects," Hosono told a news conference. "First, the system will solve the problem of contaminated water, which gave all sorts of worries to the world. Second, it will enable stable cooling of reactors."

Reactors at the plant, on the Pacific coast 240 km (150 miles) north of Tokyo, went into meltdown after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami knocked out their cooling systems.


An undated composite montage image of laser scan data and construction data shows the damaged No. 1 reactor of the Tokyo Electric Power Co.(TEPCO)’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and its completion image with a polyester cover over it, in this handout released by TEPCO June 14, 2011. TEPCO said that it would start to build a giant cover shield around the reactors building on June 27, for a stopgap measure to prevent further release of radioactive substances into the atmosphere.
REUTERS/Tokyo Electric Power Co/Handout

Plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co is running out of space to store a huge amount of radioactive water that has accumulated during efforts to cool the reactors. It hopes the new system, which decontaminates water and re-circulates it to reduce reactor temperatures, will help achieve its goal of bringing the plant to stability by next January.

Thousands of residents remain in temporary housing after being evacuated from around the plant due to radiation leaks.

The water treatment system, using technology from French nuclear group Areva and U.S. company Kurion, is designed to handle 1,200 tons of radioactive water a day.

Tokyo Electric expects processing the estimated 250,000 tons of water that will have been contaminated by the time the crisis ends to cost about 53 billion yen ($660 million). More than 100,000 tons of highly radioactive water has already collected at the plant.

The utility dumped low-level radioactive water into the sea in April to make room to store more highly contaminated water, irking neighboring countries including China and South Korea.

Article from: ca.reuters.com






Related Articles
Worse than meltdown, ’melt-through’ has occurred at Fukushima; Official suggests Japan could become ’uninhabitable’
Japan Finally Admits TOTAL Meltdown at 3 Nuclear Reactors Within Hours of Earthquake...
Atmosphere Above Japan Heated Rapidly Before M9 Earthquake
Japan to Cover Damaged Nuclear Reactors with Giant Tents
Israel returns nuclear waste to US
Tritium leaks from US nuclear sites
America’s Fukushima? Cooper Nuclear Plant in Nebraska Flooded
Dr Helen Caldicott - Fukushima Nuclear Disaster


Latest News from our Front Page

Galaxy Poll: 86 per cent of Australians want childhood vaccination to be compulsory?
2015-04-17 23:33
Australians want Prime Minister Tony Abbott to make childhood vaccination compulsory and close loopholes that allow vaccine refusers to put all children at risk. An exclusive national Galaxy poll commissioned by The Sunday Telegraph has revealed overwhelming support to ensure every child is vaccinated. The highest support for compulsory jabs is in South Australia, where 90 per cent support the call. The poll ...
Eye in the sky: Local police now using drones to spy on citizens
2015-04-17 22:09
The Harris County Precinct 1 Constable's Office is doing something that no other agency in Harris County is believed to have done yet: Use drones to help fight crime. It's an eye in the sky for law enforcement, without giving up the element of surprise. "It could absolutely save lives," says Constable Alan Rosen. Rosen says the agency's two new $1,200 drones, which ...
New Zealander of the Year: refuse vaccines, lose money
2015-04-17 22:47
Following in the footsteps of Australia, 2014 New Zealander of the Year, Dr. Lance O’Sullivan, wants to punish people who don’t get vaccinated. The New Zealand Herald (4/15) reports: “A leading New Zealand doctor has called on the Government to follow Australia’s example to cut child welfare payments to families who do not vaccinate their children, saying the policy would help protect ...
Iris Scanner Identifies a Person 40 Feet Away
2015-04-17 22:20
Police traffic stops are in the news again, tragically, sparking a new round of discussion on whether and how to outfit police with cameras and other technology. For several years now, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s CyLab Biometrics Center have been testing an iris recognition system that can be used to identify subjects at a range of up to 40 feet. Like ...
Yes, You Can Catch Insanity
2015-04-17 22:29
One day in March 2010, Isak McCune started clearing his throat with a forceful, violent sound. The New Hampshire toddler was 3, with a Beatles mop of blonde hair and a cuddly, loving personality. His parents had no idea where the guttural tic came from. They figured it was springtime allergies. Soon after, Isak began to scream as if in pain ...
More News »