Argentine Dictators Go On Trial For Baby Thefts
2011 03 03

By Michael Warren | HuffingtonPost.com



A long-awaited trial began Monday for two former Argentine dictators who allegedly oversaw a systematic plan to steal babies born to political prisoners three decades ago.

Jorge Videla and Reynaldo Bignone are accused in 34 cases of infants who were taken from mothers held in Argentina’s largest clandestine torture and detention centers, the Navy Mechanics School in Buenos Aires and the Campo de Mayo army base northwest of the city.

Also on trial are five military figures and a doctor who attended to the detainees.

The case was opened 14 years ago at the request of the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo, a leading human rights group. It may take up to a year to hear testimony from about 370 witnesses.

Videla, 85, has been sentenced to life in prison, and Bignone, 83, is serving a 25-year term for other crimes committed during the 1976-1983 dictatorship, but this is the first trial focused on the alleged plan to steal as many as 400 infants from leftists who were kidnapped, tortured and made to disappear during the junta’s crackdown on political dissent.

There are 13,000 people on the official list of those killed, although rights groups estimate as many as 30,000 died.

The dictatorship generally drew the line at killing children, but the existence of babies belonging to people who officially no longer existed created a problem for the junta leaders. The indictment alleges they solved it by falsifying paperwork and arranging illegal adoptions by people sympathetic to the military regime.

Some 500 women were known to be pregnant before they disappeared, according to formal complaints from their families or other official witness accounts. To date, 102 people born to vanished dissidents have since recovered their true identities with the aid of the Grandmothers, which helped create a national database of DNA evidence to match children with their birth families.

The stolen grandchildren of Estela de Carlotto, co-founder of the Grandmothers, and poet Juan Gelman are among the cases cited in this trial.

Rights activists are hoping for long sentences for Videla, who led the first military junta after the 1976 coup, and Bignone, who ran the Campo de Mayo center and then served as Argentina’s last military president before the return of democracy in 1983.

Also on trial are Jorge Luis Magnacco, a doctor who worked in the navy detention center, and five prominent dictatorship figures: Antonio Vanek, the junta’s former navy attache in Washington; Jorge "Tigre" Acosta, who allegedly ran the navy center’s torture sessions; former army Gen. Santiago Riveros, responsible for gathering intelligence from detainees at Campo de Mayo; former admiral Ruben Franco; and former prefect Juan Antonio Azic, who allegedly tortured detainees under Acosta’s direction.

The defendants, all now old and gray-haired, were led in handcuffs into the courtroom as a three-judge panel opened the trial. Photographers and cameramen were briefly allowed in. After a short time, Videla began to nod off as the clerk read aloud several lengthy indictments.

Ending impunity for human rights violations committed by the dictatorship is a top priority for President Cristina Fernandez, whose center-left government includes many people who fought the military regime in one way or another.

After years of preparation following the reversal of amnesties by Argentina’s congress and Supreme Court, more than 20 cases have reached trial.

The defendants did not speak Monday, but they and their supporters have dismissed the entire process as an act of revenge by the leftist ideologues they defeated decades ago, and they deny there was any plan to steal babies.

Leonardo Fossati’s mother was three months pregnant when she was kidnapped in 1977 and she gave birth to him in police custody before vanishing.

Fossati rediscovered his birth family in 2005 with help from the Grandmothers, and he is a plaintiff in the case.

"This trial is necessary to set things straight," he said. "For a long time now, they have denied there was a systematic plan to steal babies."


Article from: huffingtonpost.com


Sculpture at the ESMA’s fence in memory of the disappeared mothers and the babies they had in that clandestine center during the last dictatorship (1976-1983). The names written on the pregnant woman image are those of the babies who were born there.Wikipedia




Also tune into:

Peter Levenda - Secret Space Program & NASA’s Nazis

Peter Levenda - South American Nazis, Operation Condor & NASAs Space Program

Peter Levenda - Sinister Forces

Pierre Sabak - Priesthood of the Nazarenes, The Nazis & Zionists

Aaron Kaplan - Operation Highjump, The Secret Diary of Admiral Byrd & The Nephilim Agenda






Related Articles
What’s up in Washington DC? - Conspiracy of Silence & The Franklin Cover-Up (Video)
Israel sold weapons to Myanmar Junta, then lies about the sales


Latest News from our Front Page

Cyclopean Masonry: A Mystery of the Ancient World
2014 04 16
They don’t make things like they used to, and that is, in some cases, a monumental understatement. Silly wordplay notwithstanding, there is something to be said for the construction techniques of the old world. Where modern buildings are designed to withstand the elements; wind, temperature extremes, earthquakes and floods, today’s engineers have to strike a balance between economics ...
Megalithic Origins : Ancient connections between Göbekli Tepe and Peru
2014 04 16
At 6,500 years older than Stonehenge and 7,000 years before the pyramids were constructed, a cult megalithic complex sat atop the hills near current day Sanliurfa, in southeast Turkey. Göbekli Tepe was flourishing an astonishing 12,000 - 14,000 years ago, and today, the preserved remains still exhibits high degrees of sophistication and megalithic engineering skill. Back in the 1990’s when ...
Department of Transportation Uses LRAD Sound Cannons Against Drivers
2014 04 16
The Missouri Department of Transportation revealed two newly acquired LRAD sound cannons this week, which will reportedly be used to target vehicles that speed in work zones. Coming in at $25,000 a piece, the Long-Range Acoustic Device, a sonic weapon best know for its use against protesters and insurgents in Afghanistan, will alert drivers to road conditions by shooting a loud ...
An ’Unknown Holocaust’ and the Hijacking of History
2014 04 16
An address by Mark Weber, director of the Institute for Historical Review, delivered at an IHR meeting in Orange County, California, on July 25, 2009. (A report on the meeting is posted here.) We hear a lot about terrible crimes committed by Germans during World War II, but we hear very little about crimes committed against Germans. Germany’s defeat in May ...
Ex-Mayor Bloomberg Starting $50 Million Gun-Control Network
2014 04 16
Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg ramped up his efforts to fight gun violence on Wednesday with a plan to spend $50 million on a grassroots network to organize voters on gun control. The initiative’s political target is the powerful pro-gun lobby, including the National Rifle Association, that spends millions of dollars each year to back gun-rights supporters. Bloomberg’s group, called Everytown ...
More News »