The ’bionic men’ of World War I
2014-06-30 0:00

By Thomas Schlich | CNN



World War I slaughtered and mutilated soldiers on a scale the world had never seen. It’s little wonder that its vast numbers of returning crippled veterans led to major gains in the technology of prosthetic limbs.

Virtually every device produced today to replace lost body function of soldiers returning from our modern wars -- as well as accident victims, or victims of criminal acts, such as the Boston Marathon bombings -- has its roots in the technological advances that emerged from World War I.

The war, which began nearly 100 years ago, produced its own crop of bionic men. In previous wars, severely injured soldiers often succumbed to gangrene and infection. Thanks to better surgery, many now survived. On the German side alone, there were 2 million casualties, 64 percent of them with injured limbs. Some 67,000 were amputees. Over 4,000 amputations were performed on U.S. service personnel according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

In all nations involved in the war an emerging generation of so-called "war cripples," as they were referred to in Germany, loomed ominously over the pension and welfare system, and many government bureaucrats, military leaders and civilians worried about their long-term fate.

[...]

Read the full article at: cnn.com



Related Articles
Bionic Olympics to be hosted in 2016
Soldier Andrew Garthwaite moves bionic arm by thoughts
’Bionic Man’ will walk the streets of Washington, DC tomorrow
Researchers make ’bionic ear’ with 3-D printer
UK Roboticists Build Rex, the Bionic Man
Man Climbs 103 Floors on a Brain-Powered Bionic Leg
Bionic revolution: The tech getting disabled people into work
"Super-Soldiers" Fight Disease With Bionic Implants
"Should I have my hand cut off?" Woman considers bionic replacement
Transhumanist Bankers Plan Robotic Future
Ray marches on pimpin the new transhuman religion
Transhumansm; Merging With Technology


Latest News from our Front Page

Scary Times For California Farmers As Snowpack Hits Record Lows
2015-04-02 2:45
The water outlook in drought-racked California just got a lot worse: Snowpack levels across the entire Sierra Nevada are now the lowest in recorded history — just 6 percent of the long-term average. That shatters the previous low record on this date of 25 percent, set in 1977 and again last year. Morning traffic makes its way toward downtown Los Angeles ...
Sharia Policeman in Swedish School
2015-04-02 0:58
Editor's Note: Unfortunately this is not an April Fools story. On monday morning emergency services were called to Eductus in BorĂĄs, a school specialized in teaching Swedish to immigrants, after a Muslim student threatened classmates who did not abide by his strict interpretation of Islam. They were reprimanded for laughing and a Christian woman who refused to wear a veil fainted ...
“Us” and “Them”
2015-04-01 22:30
I’ve decided to translate yet another one of Julia Caesar’s popular Sunday chronicles available in Swedish on the website Snaphanen. This one is named “Us and Them” and concerns a scandal of epic proportions, the Swedish governments “society coach” program. The plan was for the coaches to assist newly arrived immigrants with getting jobs and becoming integrated into society. The ...
The Expulsion and Extermination of Eastern European Germans: An Overview
2015-04-01 17:40
"Since the end of the war about 3,000,000 people, mostly women and children and overaged men, have been killed in eastern Germany and south-eastern Europe; about 15,000,000 people have been deported or had to flee from their homesteads and are on the road. About 25 per cent of these people, over 3,000,000 have died. About 4,000,000 men and women have ...
Your Smartphone Could be Tracking You Every 3 Minutes, Study Says
2015-04-01 2:24
Your apps want to know where you are Smartphone apps regularly collect large amounts of data on users’ locations, sometimes as often as every three minutes, new research suggests. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University conducted a study where they asked 23 people to use their Android smartphones normally, and tracked location data requests from each device with specially designed software, the Wall ...
More News »